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The United States presidential election of 2016 was the 58th quadrennial American presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016. Democratic candidate and incumbent President William J. Rutherford had come into office in January 2013 with the United States gripped in the Great Recession, with immigrant rights becoming a major issue, and with foreign policy crises in the Middle East, Korean Peninsula, and Venezuela. Rutherford and the Democratic Congress had embarked upon a series of tax relief, infrastructure reform, labor reform, civil rights reform, and educational reform initiatives which had become known as the New Destiny. The President, had successfully negotiated an end to the Iranian-Saudi Arabian crisis and intervened decisively in Venezuela on behalf of the pro-democratic insurgents. Moreover, he had greatly reduced both inflation and unemployment and had passed the pivotal comprehensive Civil Rights Protections Act. Rutherford, consequently, who enjoyed high approval ratings with the American populace, won 63.6% of the popular vote, the highest win by a candidate since James Monroe's re-election in 1820. It was the most lopsided US presidential election in terms of both popular and electoral votes. No candidate for president has since equaled or surpassed Rutherford's percentage of the popular vote, and since 1820, only Abraham Lincoln in 1864, Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1936, Richard M. Nixon in 1972, and Ronald Reagan in 1984 have won by a similar electoral vote margin.

The Republican candidate, businessman Donald J. Trump of New York, suffered from a lack of support within his own party, his controversial statements and business record, and his deeply unpopular political positions. Rutherford continued to advocate for the New Destiny and successfully portrayed Trump as being a dangerous extremist. Rutherford easily won reelection to the Presidency, carrying 48 of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. He obtained 527 electoral votes to Trump's 11. Trump carried just two states, both of which were traditionally Republican (Wyoming and Oklahoma), in addition to the heavily Republican 3rd district of Nebraska.

Trump's unsuccessful bid spelled an end to the historic conservative movement and caused a realignment within the Republican Party that ultimately led to the election of Tim Scott in 2024. His campaign still received its greatest amount of support from historic Republican regions in the South and Interior West. Conversely, Rutherford became the first Democrat to win the states of Utah, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska since Lyndon Johnson in 1964, the first to win Alabama since 1976, and only the second Democrat to win Arkansas since 1980.

No post 2016 presidential candidate has been able to better Rutherford's performance in the Electoral College, in the popular vote, or on a geographical basis. Moreover, Rutherford had the best performance of any Democratic presidential candidate since Lyndon B. Johnson. This was the last election held before the admission of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

General electionEdit

CampaignEdit

Although Trump had been successful in overcoming opposing factions at the Republican National Convention, he was unable to broaden his base of support for the general election. Shortly before the Convention, he had alienated moderate Republicans by coming out in opposition to the Civil Rights Protections Act, which Rutherford championed and signed into law. Trump said that he considered civil rights to be a state, rather than a federal issue, believed that the 2016 act was unconstitutional, and that it infringed upon law enforcement. Trump's opposition to the legislation helped cause black and Hispanic voters to vote overwhelmingly for the President. Trump also expressed his strong opposition to the Supreme Court's ruling in Gonzales v. Arizona (2012), which had reaffirmed the right of all refugees fleeing to American soil. Moreover, Trump became known for his controversial statements on a variety of subjects. Many of these statements were given wide publicity by the Democrats. In the early 2010s, Trump had referred to former President John McCain's foreign policies as "misguided, ridiculous, and a step in the wrong direction", and said they were a "giveaway to America's enemies." Moreover, he criticized McCain's military background, claiming that he was not a hero and that he did not deserve credit for his experiences while in Vietnamese captivity. McCain never forgave Trump for this; Trump also criticized McCain's policies relating to inflation, corporate taxation, and environmental issues.

In December 2013, Trump told a news conference that Mexicans and others from Latin America were "rapists, criminals, bringing drugs and crime across the border." When criticized by Florida Senator Marco Rubio four months later, Trump made snide remarks about "flooding Miami" and "sending Little Marco and his homies back across to Havana, where they belong", comments which outraged Cubans, and were considered disgraceful by many Americans. This came back to haunt him, as the Rutherford campaign aired an ad accusing him of disregarding whole segments of the American population, as did comments Trump made denigrating minorities, attacking journalists and others, and objectifying women. He also proposed abandoning all exploration efforts by NASA into outer space, saying that America should not waste time "chasing space ghosts", a viewpoint seen as ridiculous by many Americans. In regards to foreign policy, Trump criticized the President's negotiation efforts in Iran, called for an active military intervention in Africa (opposed by many Americans), and even talked of using nuclear weapons against North Korea.

Trump was also hurt by the reluctance of many other Republicans to support him. Governors John Kasich of Ohio and Scott Walker of Wisconsin refused to endorse Trump and did not campaign for him. Former President George H.W. Bush commented negatively about Trump to his associates and family, urging all Americans to stand up against "hatred and bigotry" and expressing strong disagreement with Trump's platform. He too refused to endorse Trump. Other prominent Republicans, such as former Governor Jeb Bush of Florida, Senator Lindsay Graham of South Carolina, Governor Brian Sandoval of Nevada, and House Minority Leader Paul Ryan of Wisconsin also refused to endorse or campaign for Trump; Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky remained silent about the Republican nominee. Many Republican publications, such as the New Hampshire Union Leader, the Arizona Republic, the Houston Chronicle, The Dallas Morning-News, and the Columbus Dispatch, among others, endorsed Rutherford; in fact, of the nation's top 100 newspapers, not a single one backed Trump. Other Republican outlets, such as the Detroit News, the Chicago Tribune, and the National Review, endorsed Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson, former Governor of New Mexico.

Whereas former Republican Presidents Bush and McCain refused to endorse Trump and did not campaign for him, Rutherford received the strong support of former Democratic Presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, and Al Gore, all of whom campaigned vigorously on his behalf.

Ads and slogansEdit

Rutherford positioned himself as a moderate and succeeded in portraying Trump as a extremist. As mentioned above, Trump's habit about making wild and unsubstantiated statements concerning foreign policy, economics, society, and the like, as well as his unpopular political positions, could be turned against him. The President's surrogates warned that the businessman, if elected, would reverse the progress made to restore American economic strength. Rutherford also touted his policies in relation to taxation, the federal budget, and corporate regulation, policies which won him the support of many independents and moderates. On September 7, 2016, the President's campaign, responding to allegations of Trump's bias against Jews, Muslims, and Mormons, among other religious minority groups, launched what became the most famous advertisement of the election: "The American Mosaic". This mosaic depicted Americans of all racial, ethnic, social, and religious backgrounds, was decked in patriotic themes, and touted the concept of the "melting pot", so classic to American history and thought. Another Rutherford ad, "The Reasonable Voters", showed interview clips of various, everyday Americans, expressing their disgust with Trump's comments, his ideology, and his voting record. Voters increasingly viewed Trump as a fringe candidate; many Republicans considered him to be not a true successor to Ronald Reagan. Trump's slogan, "Make America Great Again" was successfully twisted by Rutherford's campaign into "Take America Down Again". Other Rutherford slogans touted the themes of "America Forward!", "Move on with WJR", and "When you vote straight (for Rutherford), you vote right."

Three presidential debates and one vice-presidential debate were held during the campaign. The presidential debates were at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York (September 26); Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri (October 9); and the University of Nevada at Las Vegas, in Las Vegas, Nevada (October 19). The vice-presidential debate was held on October 4 at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. Rutherford scored a decisive win in all three debates, exposing Trump as a fraud and weakening his populist appeal. In the vice-presidential debate, VP Ford similarly routed Trump's running mate, Pence. A Gallup poll of October 22, 2016, revealed that 73% of Americans believed that Rutherford was more competent and informed than Trump; 64% disagreed with Trump's foreign and economic policy views; and 60% expressed strong dismay with his statements and prior record.

Rutherford led Trump in all opinion polls by huge margins throughout the entire campaign.

ResultsEdit

The election was held on November 8, 2016. Rutherford beat Trump in the general election, winning over 63% of the popular vote, the highest percentage since the popular vote first became widespread in 1824. In the end, Trump won only the traditionally Republican states of Wyoming and Oklahoma in the West, along with the 3rd district of Nebraska. This was the worst showing for the Republicans in the South since 1976.

2016 64% Democratic Landslide

Election results by county.

  William Rutherford
  Donald Trump

Election of 2016, by Congressional District

2016 Presidential Election, Results by Congressional District.

The 2016 election was a major milestone for the Democratic Party, as Rutherford became only the second Democrat in history, following Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964, to carry the state of Alaska, and the first since Johnson to win the traditional Republican strongholds of Utah, Idaho, North and South Dakota, Kansas, and Nebraska. More importantly, he became the first Democrat in 72 years, since Franklin D. Roosevelt in his last reelection of 1944, to win every single state that had belonged to the Confederacy. In doing so, he was the first since Jimmy Carter in 1976 to carry Alabama, and the first since Bill Clinton in 1996 to carry Arkansas, Tennessee, and Louisiana. He was also the first Democrat since Clinton that year to win Kentucky and West Virginia.

Of the 3,142 counties, independent municipalities, and parishes making returns, Rutherford won in 2,207 (70.24%) while Trump carried 935 (29.76%).

The Rutherford landslide defeated many conservative Republican congressmen, giving him a majority that could enact more of his legislation.

The Rutherford campaign broke two previous American election records, which had previously been held by Ronald Reagan and Lyndon Johnson: the highest absolute total of Electoral College votes won by a major-party presidential candidate running for the White House (with 527 to the 525 won by Reagan in 1984), and the largest share of the popular vote under the current Democratic/Republican competition (Johnson won 61.1% nationwide, Rutherford 63.6%). Rutherford retains the largest absolute number of electoral votes and the highest percentage of the popular vote as of the 2028 election.

United States presidential election, 2016
Party Presidential Candidate Vice-Presidential Candidate Popular Vote Percentage Electoral Vote Percentage
Democratic William Rutherford Harold Ford 83,157,608 63.58% 527 97.95%
Republican Donald Trump Michael Pence 44,559,322 34.07% 11 2.05%
Popular vote
Rutherford
  
63.58%
Trump
  
34.07%
Others
  
2.35%
Electoral vote
Rutherford
  
97.95%
Trump
  
2.05%

Geography of resultsEdit

United States presidential election results by state, 2016

Map of the 2016 presidential election by state.

United States presidential election by county, 2016 (percentages)

Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote.


2016 Results by State with Percentages

Map of the 2016 presidential election by state with electoral votes.

Map of the 2016 Election by County, Large Version

Presidential election results by county.

United States presidential election by state margin, 2016

Map of the 2016 presidential election by state with percentages.

United States presidential election results by state, 2016, county majority results

Election results by county majority. Blue indicates states where Pres. Rutherford won and carried the majority of counties; light blue states where Trump carried a majority, but Rutherford won the state. Red states are the two states Trump won and carried the majority of counties.

White vote by state, 2016.

White vote by state. Blue indicates states where a majority of whites voted Democratic. Red indicates states where a majority of whites voted Republican. Nebraska's 3rd district is not shown; there, the majority of whites voted Republican.

Election of 2016 Results, by Popular Vote

2016 Popular Vote, Bar Graph.

Election of 2016 Results, by Electoral Vote

2016 Electoral Vote, Bar Graph.

Results by stateEdit

State PV Winner EV Popular Votes Percentage (%) PV Loser EV Popular Votes Percentage (%) Margin Margin (%)
Alabama Rutherford 9 1,073,023 52.24 Trump 0 957,803 46.63 115,220 5.61
Alaska Rutherford 3 165,970 55.46 Trump 0 115,172 38.49 50,798 16.97
Arizona Rutherford 11 1,384,152 59.31 Trump 0 892,778 38.26 491,374 21.05
Arkansas Rutherford 6 547,670 49.40 Trump 0 517,644 46.70 30,026 2.70
California Rutherford 55 9,801,569 73.28 Trump 0 3,328,938 24.21 6,562,631 49.07
Colorado Rutherford 9 1,640,737 62.84 Trump 0 828,637 31.74 812,100 31.10
Connecticut Rutherford 7 1,109,033 69.28 Trump 0 475,593 29.71 633,440 39.57
Delaware Rutherford 3 285,818 68.60 Trump 0 122,290 29.35 163,528 39.25
D.C. Rutherford 3 281,162 91.78 Trump 0 18,204 5.94 262,958 85.84
Florida Rutherford 29 5,465,722 63.73 Trump 0 3,037,072 35.41 2,428,650 28.32
Georgia Rutherford 16 2,211,002 58.20 Trump 0 1,532,546 40.34 678,456 17.88
Hawaii Rutherford 4 352,743 79.51 Trump 0 80,330 18.11 272,413 61.40
Idaho Rutherford 4 440,408 50.74 Trump 0 270,211 41.51 170,197 9.23
Illinois Rutherford 20 3,497,663 67.45 Trump 0 1,562,040 30.12 1,935,623 37.33
Indiana Rutherford 11 1,489,793 56.90 Trump 0 1,069,503 40.85 420,290 16.05
Iowa Rutherford 6 1,049,566 62.57 Trump 0 594,698 35.45 454,868 27.12
Kansas Rutherford 6 633,513 52.95 Trump 0 508,146 42.47 125,367 10.48
Kentucky Rutherford 8 985,151 51.92 Trump 0 872,487 45.99 112,664 5.93
Louisiana Rutherford 8 1,084,570 54.34 Trump 0 871,881 43.68 212,689 10.66
Maine Rutherford 4 473,997 65.89 Trump 0 217,409 30.22 256,588 35.67
Maryland Rutherford 10 2,008,727 72.95 Trump 0 677,548 24.61 1,331,179 48.34
Massachusetts Rutherford 11 2,321,188 70.92 Trump 0 871,075 26.61 1,450,113 44.31
Michigan Rutherford 16 3,154,581 64.96 Trump 0 1,640,742 33.79 1,513,839 31.17
Minnesota Rutherford 10 1,906,382 65.01 Trump 0 918,130 31.31 988,252 33.70
Mississippi Rutherford 6 759,706 56.02 Trump 0 584,059 43.07 175,647 12.95
Missouri Rutherford 10 1,599,803 57.11 Trump 0 1,149,659 41.04 450,144 16.07
Montana Rutherford 3 258,190 53.67 Trump 0 174,215 36.21 83,975 17.46
Nebraska Rutherford 4 407,861 53.23 Trump 1 331,463 43.26 76,398 9.97
Nevada Rutherford 6 674,193 67.39 Trump 0 301,942 30.18 372,251 37.21
New Hampshire Rutherford 4 459,711 63.47 Trump 0 254,192 35.10 205,519 28.37
New Jersey Rutherford 14 2,494,160 69.78 Trump 0 1,035,985 28.98 1,458,175 40.80
New Mexico Rutherford 5 573,758 69.07 Trump 0 202,944 24.43 370,634 44.64
New York Rutherford 29 5,472,401 73.08 Trump 0 1,871,607 24.99 3,600,794 48.09
North Carolina Rutherford 15 2,822,505 60.15 Trump 0 1,815,735 38.69 1,006,770 21.46
North Dakota Rutherford 3 181,184 54.37 Trump 0 135,469 40.65 45,715 13.72
Ohio Rutherford 18 3,389,790 61.16 Trump 0 2,054,467 37.07 1,335,323 24.09
Oklahoma Trump 7 681,198 52.04 Rutherford 0 627,717 47.96 53,481 4.08
Oregon Rutherford 7 1,222,805 65.70 Trump 0 540,665 29.05 682,140 36.65
Pennsylvania Rutherford 20 3,515,237 63.15 Trump 0 1,949,625 35.03 1,565,812 28.12
Rhode Island Rutherford 4 315,617 72.13 Trump 0 112,547 25.72 203,070 46.41
South Carolina Rutherford 9 1,137,448 56.68 Trump 0 836,344 41.68 301,104 15.00
South Dakota Rutherford 3 201,017 55.47 Trump 0 147,047 40.58 53,970 14.89
Tennessee Rutherford 11 1,278,619 52.30 Trump 0 1,127,198 46.10 151,421 6.20
Texas Rutherford 38 4,470,146 57.32 Trump 0 3,125,316 40.07 1,344,830 17.25
Utah Rutherford 6 554,182 53.24 Trump 0 317,018 30.46 237,164 22.78
Vermont Rutherford 3 236,923 74.49 Trump 0 75,997 23.90 160,926 50.59
Virginia Rutherford 13 2,557,626 64.47 Trump 0 1,355,011 34.15 1,202,615 30.32
Washington Rutherford 12 2,275,562 68.03 Trump 0 922,873 27.59 1,352,389 40.44
West Virginia Rutherford 5 346,401 49.34 Trump 0 335,747 47.82 10,654 1.52
Wisconsin Rutherford 10 1,954,504 62.95 Trump 0 1,108,807 35.71 845,697 27.24
Wyoming Trump 3 121,315 48.15 Rutherford 0 116,502 46.24 4,813 1.91
TOTALS Overall Winner EV Popular Votes Percentage (%) Loser EV Popular Votes Percentage Margin Margin (%)
538 Rutherford 527 83,157,608 63.58 Trump 11 44,559,322 34.07 38,598,286 29.51

Close statesEdit

Margin of victory less than 5% (21 electoral votes):

  1. West Virginia, 1.52%
  2. Wyoming, 1.91%
  3. Arkansas, 2.70%
  4. Oklahoma, 4.08%

Margin of victory over 5%, but less than 10% (32 electoral votes):

  1. Alabama, 5.61%
  2. Kentucky, 5.93%
  3. Tennessee, 6.20%
  4. Idaho, 9.23%
  5. Nebraska, 9.97%

State margins and county informationEdit

States with the Smallest Margin of Victory:

State EV Total Vote  % Margin Margin Rutherford Trump
West Virginia 5 702,139 1.52% 10,654 49.34% 47.82%
Wyoming 3 251,971 1.91% 4,813 46.24% 48.15%
Arkansas 6 1,108,560 2.70% 30,026 49.40% 46.70%
Oklahoma 7 1,308,915 4.08% 53,481 47.96% 52.04%
Alabama 9 2,054,045 5.61% 115,220 52.24% 46.63%
Kentucky 8 1,897,293 5.93% 112,664 51.92% 45.99%
Tennessee 11 2,444,854 6.20% 151,421 52.30% 46.10%
Idaho 4 650,921 9.23% 170,197 50.74% 41.51%
Nebraska 5 766,280 9.97% 76,398 53.23% 43.26%
Kansas 6 1,194,447 10.48% 125,367 52.95% 42.47%

States with the Largest Margin of Victory:

State EV Total Vote  % Margin Margin Rutherford Trump
District of Columbia 3 306,328 85.84% 262,958 91.78% 5.94%
Hawaii 4 443,662 61.40% 272,413 79.51% 18.11%
Vermont 3 318,044 50.59% 160,926 74.49% 23.90%
California 55 13,375,962 49.07% 6,563,631 73.28% 24.21%
Maryland 10 2,753,571 48.34% 1,331,179 72.95% 24.61%
New York 29 7,488,295 48.09% 3,600,794 73.08% 24.99%
Rhode Island 12 437,587 46.41% 203,070 72.13% 25.72%
New Mexico 4 830,698 44.64% 370,634 69.07% 24.43%
Massachusetts 11 3,273,025 44.31% 1,450,113 70.92% 26.61%
New Jersey 14 3,574,572 40.80% 1,458,175 69.78% 28.98%

States with Highest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Trump Percentage
District of Columbia 91.78% Oklahoma 52.04%
Hawaii 79.51% Wyoming 48.15%
Vermont 74.49% West Virginia 47.82%
California 73.28% Arkansas 46.70%
New York 73.08% Alabama 46.63%

States with Lowest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Trump Percentage
Wyoming 46.24% District of Columbia 5.94%
Oklahoma 47.96% Hawaii 18.11%
West Virginia 49.34% Vermont 23.90%
Arkansas 49.40% California 24.21%
Idaho 50.74% New Mexico 24.43%

State Ranks:

Rank Rutherford Trump
1 49 2
2 2 49

County Ranks:

Rank Rutherford Trump
1 2,207 935
2 935 2,207

Congressional District Ranks:

Rank Rutherford Trump
1 406 29
2 29 406


Counties with Highest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Trump Percentage
San Francisco, CA 97.86% King, TX 89.06%
Jim Hogg, TX 97.03% Oldham, TX 88.10%
Ogala Lakota, SD 96.01% Motley, TX 86.55%
Holmes, MS 95.87% Roberts, TX 84.32%
Bronx, NY 93.09% Wheeler, TX 82.71%

Counties with Lowest Percent of Vote:

Rutherford Percentage Trump Percentage
King, TX 10.90% San Francisco, CA 2.84%
Oldham, TX 11.24% Jim Hogg, TX 2.90%
Motley, TX 13.05% Ogala Lakota, SD 3.76%
Roberts, TX 15.44% Holmes, MS 4.01%
Wheeler, TX 17.04% Bronx, NY 6.26%

Counties with Lowest Percent of Vote and Win:

Rutherford Percentage Trump Percentage
Wayne, UT 49.58% Elkhart, IN 47.58%
Lander, NV 49.62% Johnson, IL 48.03%
Saline, AR 49.65% Fall River, SD 48.23%
Beaverhead, MT 49.67% Martin, MN 48.38%
Caddo, OK 49.75% Fayette, WV 48.72%

Counties with Highest Percent of Vote and Lose:

Rutherford Percentage Trump Percentage
Madison, KY 49.94% Kane, UT 49.95%
Meade, SD 49.93% Wichita, TX 49.91%
Caroll, MO 49.91% Love, OK 49.84%
Humboldt, IA 49.90% Curry, NM 49.83%
Bottineau, ND 49.86% Paulding, GA 49.81%

Results by demographic group (third party vote: 2.35%)Edit

2016 Presidential vote by demographic subgroup
Demographic subgroup Rutherford Trump Other  % of
total vote
Total vote 64 34 2 100
Ideology
Liberals 96 1 3 25
Moderates 68 29 3 41
Conservatives 29 70 1 35
Party
Democrats 98 1 1 38
Republicans 23 76 1 32
Independents 63 32 5 29
Gender
Men 58 39 3 47
Women 68 31 1 53
Gender by marital status
Married men 50 48 2 29
Married women 59 39 1 31
Single men 68 28 4 18
Single women 79 19 2 23
Race/ethnicity
White 55 43 2 72
Black 95 4 1 13
Asian 77 22 1 3
Other 62 34 4 2
Hispanic 77 21 2 10
Religion
Protestant or other Christian 55 44 1 51
Catholic 66 33 2 25
Mormon 50 36 14 2
Jewish 81 18 1 2
Other 86 11 3 7
None 82 14 4 12
Religious service attendance
More than once a week 48 51 1 14
Once a week 53 46 1 28
A few times a month 67 32 1 13
A few times a year 68 30 2 27
Never 74 22 4 17
White evangelical or born-again Christian?
White evangelical or born-again Christian 33 66 1 26
Everyone else 72 25 3 74
Age
18–24 years old 72 24 4 11
25–29 years old 72 26 2 8
30–39 years old 67 30 3 17
40–49 years old 60 38 2 20
50–64 years old 59 40 1 28
65 and older 57 43 0 16
Sexual orientation
LGBT 88 10 2 5
Heterosexual 62 36 2 95
Education
Not a high school graduate 76 23 1 3
High school graduate 63 36 1 21
Some college education 61 36 3 29
College graduate 61 37 2 29
Postgraduate education 67 30 3 18
Family income
Under $30,000 75 23 2 20
$30,000–49,999 69 30 1 21
$50,000–99,999 59 39 2 31
$100,000–199,999 57 41 2 21
$200,000–249,999 60 39 1 3
Over $250,000 62 36 3 4
Region
Northeast 71 28 1 18
Midwest 63 36 2 24
South 58 41 1 36
West 66 31 3 22
Community size
Big cities (population over 500,000) 81 17 2 11
Mid-sized cities (population 50,000 to 500,000) 70 28 2 21
Suburbs 61 37 2 47
Towns (population 10,000 to 50,000) 54 44 2 8
Rural areas 55 43 2 14

Electoral recordsEdit

  • This was the last election prior to the admission of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the penultimate election before the District of Columbia received full congressional representation.
  • The states of Idaho, Utah, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota were carried by a Democrat for the first time since 1964. Alabama was carried for the first time since 1976. Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, Louisiana, and West Virginia were carried for the first time since 1996.
  • This was the first time since 1936 that Josephine County, Oregon, Douglas County, Nevada, Ada County, Idaho, Hughes County, South Dakota, and Tulsa County, Oklahoma voted for a Democrat.
  • This was the first time in history that Ogle County, Illinois, voted Democratic, and the first time Lee County, Illinois did so since 1852.
  • Rutherford became the first Democrat in history to garner more than 70% of the vote in California, Maryland, New York, and Vermont. He also garnered over 70% in Hawaii and Rhode Island.
  • This was the first time since 1972 that the nation's most populous states were carried by a single candidate, by double-digit margins. Rutherford garnered over 60% in Florida, North Carolina, Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, and Washington, and won in Texas, Georgia, and Arizona by 17-20 percentage points.
  • This was the first time since 1944 that a Democratic presidential candidate won every single state that had constituted the Confederacy.
  • This was the first time since 1964 that a Democrat won white voters (Rutherford had lost whites 52-48% in 2012). Rutherford won 55% of whites, to Trump's 43%.
  • This was the first time since 1964 that a Democrat won Mormons. Rutherford carried them 50%, to Trump's 36%. This was critical to his victory in Utah, where Mormons provided 63% of his total vote. 14% of Mormons voted for third-party candidate Gary Johnson. Johnson, as a result, earned 15% of the vote in Utah, the only state where a third-party candidate broke double-digits. Rutherford's victory in Utah, and Johnson's performance in the state, were both attributed to their dislike of Trump, based upon his moral character, marital history, and business record.
  • Rutherford won 58% of college-educated whites and 54% of non-college educated whites. He won 58% of white women and 53% of white men. He was the first Democrat to carry both college and non-college educated voters, both among whites and in general, since Johnson.
  • Rutherford won a record 84% of the non-white vote, including 95% of African Americans, 77% of Hispanics, 77% of Asians, and 62% of others.
  • Rutherford won every county in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Hawaii.
  • Rutherford won the majority of counties in 40 states, Trump in 10 (Idaho, Wyoming, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Texas, Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia). Of the states where Trump carried a majority, Rutherford won 8.
  • This was the first time since 1924 that every county in New England voted for a single presidential candidate, and the first time in history that a Democrat swept the region's counties.
  • Rutherford won the white vote in 39 states. Trump won it in 11: Wyoming and Oklahoma (which he carried), along with Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. He also won whites in Nebraska's 3rd congressional district, though Rutherford won whites in the 1st and 2nd districts, and in the state as a whole. Trump won whites in every former Confederate state except for Florida and Virginia. Rutherford carried whites in all states outside of the Confederate South (except Wyoming and Oklahoma), including in every border state, and of course, in the former Confederate states of Florida and Virginia. In most Southern states, Rutherford won by dominating among blacks and other minorities, carrying college-educated whites, and reducing Trump's margin among non college-educated whites.

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